The 10km of My First Bridge to Brisbane

The 10km of My First Bridge to Brisbane

Cate Campbell

FULL DISCLAIMER: I am not a runner. Never have been, and probably never will be. In my opinion, ‘fun’ and ‘run’ should never be in the same sentence. I am still not sure what induced me to sign up for the Bridge to Brisbane, all I know is that I mentioned it to someone once, as something I’d vaguely like to do at some point (as in the hypothetical I’d like to do this ‘someday’ and then that ‘someday’ never arrives), and then instead of politely expressing their wish to also do it with me ‘someday’, this person took the opportunity to sign up themselves, saying they’d come and support me!

Note to self: *when mentioning the hypothetical ‘someday’ goals, do it to someone who is equally as lazy as yourself.*

So I found myself practically blackmailed into something that was technically my own idea!

Fast forward to 26 August 2018: it’s a wet and miserable morning, yet everywhere I look there are people of all age demographics and from all walks of life… Nearly 30,000 of them! At this point, I can’t understand the look of excited anticipation I see around me – “don’t you know you’re about to run 10km!” I want to yell at them. Surely that would wipe the smile of their faces. Then they’d look more like how I’m feeling; nervous and mildly terrified.

As the clock slowly ticks down to my starting time, the strangest thing begins to happen – I’m beginning to feel excited. It’s like I’ve caught a mild case of ‘running fever’ that a few of my friends have succumbed to in the past.

I don’t mind that it’s cold or rainy and somehow the prospect of running 10km seems less daunting. But before I have time to fully comprehend this alarming change of sentiment, an announcement comes over the loud speaker. It’s go time.

1st Km: I join the throng of people gently surging towards the starting line, take a deep breath, and plunge forwards down the hill. Literally six steps in, everything hurts. My knees, ankles, calves, shins and I immediately start puffing – loudly. Some little guy with dark hair and a fabulous red raincoat comes flying past me, using the running technique that can only be described as frantic. I recognise it well, it’s the one I usually employ when I am running late for an appointment or am busting for the bathroom.  This is going to be a long morning.

2nd Km: Okay, legs are warming up, the sharp pains are reducing to a dull ache, rate of puffing has only marginally increased. Maybe I can do this. I wonder how Frantic Red Raincoat is doing?!

3rd Km: Made it over the Go-Between Bridge to a beautiful acoustic cover of Vance Joy’s Riptide. There is something incredibly satisfying about running on the streets that I have driven on for the past 17 years, seeing them devoid of road rage and instead filled with community spirit. I’m feeling pretty good about myself at this point, on the verge of smiling even, something I never do while running. Suddenly Frantic Red Raincoat tears past me again. I am more than a bit confused.

4th Km: Things have gone from average to bad, all within the space of one kilometre. The muscles in my legs feel like they are slowly solidifying and my breathing is now so loud that the people in front of me shoot back anxious glances to make sure that a paramedic is not necessary. I’m not even half way yet.

5th Km: I’m now keeping an eye out for Frantic Red Raincoat… does he enjoy sprinting past the same people just to freak them out? Anyway, focus Cate. As I begin running through the city, a pair of seedy, dishevelled looking guys appear – clearly on their way home from a night out. They look thoroughly perplexed as to why this mass of humans surging through the city streets would voluntarily do this to themselves on a Sunday morning. I have to say, that as I look at them from the moral high ground with a red, sweaty face and sore legs, I can kind of see their point.

6th Km: As I wind out of the tunnel and onto the Story Bridge, my favourite Brisbane landmark, I barely notice, my field of vision has been reduced to looking at the ground two steps ahead of me. I’m brought out of this haze of self-pity by a fellow runner exclaiming how beautiful the city looks. As I raise my eyes to catch a quick glimpse of the city, who should come barreling past me AGAIN but Frantic Red Raincoat! I can’t believe it! I give a half-second thought to chasing after him and demanding an explanation, when he weaves between two people, dodges around the fittest 60 year old I’ve ever seen and disappears again.

7th Km: The signs telling you how far you’ve run seem to be mocking me, I cannot bear to look at them, and at this stage, my only thought is to keep putting one foot in front of the other. Little kids are beginning to overtake me. Have they been running the whole way? Or is this some new motivational tactic by the event organisers? Surely you can’t have that much energy after 7km.

8th Km: For the first time I begin to think that I might actually be able to do this. The end is nigh! There are people lining the cliffs on top of Kangaroo Point cheering, I like this motivational tactic much more than the super energetic kids. Feeling thoroughly energised and encouraged, I coax the two pillars of cement that are pretending to be my legs to keep going for just a bit longer.

9th Km: Bagpipes signal that the battle is almost over. Braveheart. That’s my first thought. I can see Mel Gibson with his face painted blue, sword held aloft. Now is the time to fight, now is the time to dig deep, now is the time to – wait! That’s not Frantic Red Raincoat again is it? Great Scott it is! How? Why? Where does he go in between mad dashes around people? So it is with this conundrum that I enter the final stretch. It’s much less inspirational than “They may take our lives, but they can never take our freedom!”

10th Km: As I cross the line, I see the emotions I am feeling reflected in the faces of the runners around me. Exhaustion, pain but above all, pride. I see it in mothers, in daughters, fathers, grandfathers, short people, tall people, people with brown eyes, blue eyes, red hair, brown hair, young, old. Across every identifying stereotype that society uses to separate us, there is the same expression, the same feelings, the same emotions. And in that moment I understand. I understand the power of coming together with a common goal.

Some people walked, some wheeled, some shuffled, some ran, some in maddeningly, confusing, frantic dashes. But in the end, we all had the same goal in mind, we were moving in the same direction, and I felt inexplicably connected to every single person wearing a Bridge to Brisbane bib. Community events like this have the unique ability to unite a group of people who may never fully agree on anything else in life. And even if it is only for 10km; a long, painful 10km, I think that is a beautiful thing. I’d even go so far as to call it fun. I’d still like to track down Frantic Red Raincoat though.

cate-campbell-insta

What was your favourite moment of Bridge to Brisbane 2018? Tell us in the comments below and share your race day memories on social media using #bridge2brisbane!

UNDERpreparing for Bridge to Brisbane

As the days draw closer to the annual Bridge to Brisbane (B2B) race, I find myself sitting here (in a very similar position to last year) contemplating the same old thought – WHY DIDN’T I TRAIN?

As always, I was super excited to sign up and get on board Brissy’s biggest fun run for the greatest of causes, but turning that enthusiasm into actual training and practice? Yeah, didn’t happen…and I only have myself to blame. Being the classic over-committer and stellar procrastinator that I am (as I’m sure a lot of us are!), B2B has crept up on me in a scary, unsuspecting way, usually reserved for clingy ex-boyfriends.

So, here I am, six days out from the big race, with new runners in hand and a whole lot of enthusiasm to boot, but no real training to my name (unless walking to brunch counts…).

So, what’s a girl to do? Look on the bright side, that’s what!

Here’s how I am going to make it to the B2B finish line:

1. MOVE IT, MOVE IT

First up – we must do some internal reflection (#realtalk) here. Considering there’s been ZERO training included in my schedule (as mentioned above), I’ve done myself a horrible disservice leading up to this Sunday. Fret not people! As I am going to lift my exercise game in this last week – nothing too strenuous, as I still want to conserve energy for the looming 10kms, but my goal is to walk everywhere. So, if you’re like me and a tad underprepared for this Sunday, get the heart rate pumping and stimulate that circulation by walking when and where you can.

2. MARKET RESEARCH

I am hopeful that my teenage movie marathon efforts have set me up for endurance success. So, I plan to watch a whole bunch of long distance marathon events on YouTube, as that will surely lend itself to a practical application, right? RIGHT?! (I’m trying it regardless).

3. DRINK UP

H20 is the go! Running 10kms in this ‘winter’ heat, is going to require a fair bit of hydration, so keep that water flowing – both on the day and the week prior to the event. I know I will be!

4. FIND YOUR MOTIVATION

My motivation? Is it to beat my sub 50min time from last year? Pfffft. Not going to happen. I’m telling you outright, the only thought getting me through the impending 10km’s is the after-race brekky I’ll be chowing down. So, find your food kryptonite and visualise a buffet of it waiting to be yours at the finish line. I’ll be thinking of a good ol’ smashed avo and sourdough!

In all honesty, you can take or leave any of my tips above, but the best advice I’ve been given is to have fun! Cliché, but true. Enjoy the good vibes that B2B has on offer year after year, put one foot after the other and you’ll be cruising through the finish line before you know it!

How To Put The FUN Into This Fun Run!

So, you’ve registered for Bridge to Brisbane, you’ve sorted out your best running shoes, and you’ve prepared yourself mentally and physically for completing the course. But, doing the Bridge to Brisbane doesn’t have to be challenging – in fact, you can take it as fast or as slow as you like, and have plenty of fun while doing it!

To ensure all participants have the most enjoyable day possible on August 26, we’ve pulled together our top five tips for putting the most FUN into our state’s beloved fun-run.

1. Dress to impress

When it comes to events like Bridge to Brisbane, you’re generally prepared to don your favourite activewear, built for movement and agility. However, what you might not know is that our fun run’s a little different!

You’ll see runners of all types on the course, many wearing costumes ranging from animal onesies to fairy tutus…and everything in between! Make your day at Bridge to Brisbane one to remember by donning your own best fancy dress – simply snap a photo in your costume on race day and upload it to your Facebook or Instagram with the hashtag #bridgetobrisbane for your chance to win a cash prize!

2. Fun Runnin’ Friends

Speaking of friends, bring a plus one or a group of buddies to take on the course with you to add an extra spark to your experience. Sing, laugh, chat, dance or race each other all the way through the course and into the Finish Village. Completing the course together will make sweating a little sweeter AND you’ll have someone to enjoy breakfast (and the glory!) with afterwards – it’s a win, win!

3. Running – or whatever way you get to the finish line!

Just because it’s called a fun run, doesn’t mean you need to run the entire course… or at all! Runners, joggers, wheelies and walkers are all welcome to participate in the Bridge to Brisbane.

Whatever pace you choose, the only thing that matters is that you’re having fun and making memories while doing it! With live acts and entertainment at the Start Lines and at various stages of the course, there is so much to hear and see throughout the day, so run to the rhythm, walk in time, or dance your way to the finish line.

4. Picture-perfect

Ah Brisbane, the River City! You will be passing some of Brisbane’s most Insta-worthy spots, so whip out your phone or camera and take advantage of the beautiful scenery that passes you by! You’ll be crossing the Story Bridge at least once during the race and, we think – in fact, we know – that this makes the picture-perfect spot to catch your breath and enjoy that Bridgey-didge scenery.

5. Rewards for all

Once you cross the Finish Line, it’s time to celebrate! South Bank comes alive on August 26 as Little Stanley Street and parts of the Parklands transform into our Finish Village – food, music, massages and more will all be within a few steps. Outside the Finish Village, select South Bank retailers will be open with special deals and discounts for Bridge to Brisbane participants – show your race bib to access these exclusive ‘Bib-ileges’.

Corporate teams and large groups also have the opportunity to enjoy a fun and relaxed morning in our Pop-Up Picnic Party area inside the South Bank Parklands. Here is where you can claim a dedicated space for your crew to enjoy that well-earned rest post-race, as well as access to the communal picnic games area. If that doesn’t put the fun in fun run, we don’t know what will!

So what are you waiting for? If you haven’t already, sign up now via www.bridgetobrisbane.com.au, but hurry…places are filling up fast!

Hit105’s Ultimate Bridge to Brisbane Training Playlist

Hit105’s Ultimate Bridge to Brisbane Training Playlist

There are so many benefits of listening to music while exercising. It boosts adrenaline levels, increases endorphins, and most importantly, it’s so much more fun! Music is a great motivator and training to good tunes could help achieve goals you’ve never reached before. However, listening to the wrong music can have the adverse effect, and with August 26 fast approaching, ‘ain’t nobody got time for that!’

Luckily, we’ve got friends that know a thing or two about playing some tunes that will get you moving. To help you stay on track and ensure you achieve your race day goals, our friends at Hit105 have curated their ultimate Bridge to Brisbane training playlist, just for you. Add these to your Spotify and get moving!

  1. Whatever it Takes – Imagine Dragons
  2. Eye of the Tiger – Survivor
  3. Lose Yourself – Eminem
  4. Pump It Up – Elvis Costello
  5. Summer – Calvin Harris
  6. POWER – Kanye West
  7. More Than You Know – Axwell Ingrosso
  8. What’s My Age Again – Blink 182
  9. This Girl – Kungs Cookin’ On 3 Burners
  10. It’s My Life – Bon Jovi

Have you signed up for Bridge to Brisbane yet? Put this training to good use and sign up now …but hurry, places are filling up fast!

 

Triple M’s Ultimate Bridge to Brisbane Training Playlist

Triple M’s Ultimate Bridge to Brisbane Training Playlist

Sometimes, it can be hard to motivate yourself to hit the pavement. Music makes you want to move! But choosing the right tunes to keep the pace up can be difficult and with race day on the horizon, you need a solid playlist at the ready.

Stress no more! Thankfully, we’ve got friends that know a thing or two about curating the right tunes. If you’re a lover of the classics and enjoy a little old school, our friends at Triple M have the perfect Bridge to Brisbane training playlist for you. So load up your Spotify and start running!

Triple M:

  1. Standing On The Outside – Cold Chisel
  2. American Idiot [Clean Edit] – Green Day
  3. I See Red – Split Enz
  4. You Give Love A Bad Name – Bon Jovi
  5. Smells Like Teen Spirit – Nirvana
  6. Good Times – INXS and Jimmy Barnes
  7. It’s A Long Way To The Top (If You Wanna Rock ‘n’ Roll) – AC/DC
  8. Beautiful Day – U2
  9. Love In An Elevator [Single Edit] – Aerosmith
  10. My Hero – Foo Fighters
  11. On My Mind – Powderfinger
  12. Power and the Passion – Midnight Oil
  13. We Will Rock You / We Are The Champions – Queen
  14. By The Way – Red Hot Chili Peppers
  15. White Wedding [Single Mix] – Billy Idol

Have you signed up for Bridge to Brisbane yet? Put this training to good use and sign up now …but hurry, places are filling up fast!

How to get organised for The Sunday Mail Bridge to Brisbane

How to get organised for this year’s Bridge to Brisbane

Whether you’re training to complete Bridge to Brisbane for the first time, or you’re a fun run veteran, planning will be essential in making sure you reach the finish line feeling healthy and happy. In the lead up to the big day, you’ll need to outline your goals for the run, set a training routine, and consider what food you need to fuel your body.

Goal setting for success

Everyone takes part in an event like Bridge to Brisbane for their own reasons. Some want to beat last year’s PB, others want to improve their fitness, and most are keen to raise some money for a good cause. Thinking S.M.A.R.T can help you set healthy goals that are Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Timely.

The first key to goal setting is specificity – the more specific you are about what you want to achieve, the clearer you can be about what you need to do to get there. For example, you might set your goal this year to run the entire 5km course without stopping or walking.

Then, you want to make sure your goal is measurable. A goal like “run further” doesn’t give you a measurable outcome to tick off your list, whereas you’ll know you’ve achieved your goal of running 5km when you cross the finish line. You might break this goal down into smaller measurements, starting off aiming to run 2km by the end of the month, then build up your mini-goals over time.

Goals need to be achievable to be motivating. If you know deep down that you won’t be able to reach your goal, you won’t push yourself to get there. Think carefully when setting your goals and timelines, making sure you’re not setting yourself up for failure.

At the same time, be realistic about your goals. Take into account your current circumstances and whether you’re set up for success. If you’re going to need to train for an hour every day to build up to running 5km, but you’ve only got weekends spare, you might need to rethink how realistic your goal is.

Finally, every goal needs to have a timeline for when you plan to achieve it. Bridge to Brisbane is great for this, because once you’ve registered, you know that 26 August is the day!

Getting ready to run

Training is an important part of running in an event like Bridge to Brisbane. If you’re on the couch one day and running 10km the next, you might find yourself injury prone and not quite as fit as you thought.

The Healthier. Happier. 8 week training guide is designed to prepare both first timers and experienced walkers/runners for the Bridge to Brisbane. There are three suggested training sessions each week (although you can swap or add sessions if you’re feeling up to it), with distances gradually increasing to help you complete your chosen course comfortably.

Remember that your training should include more than just distance running: stretching, strength training and cardio can all improve your running time and technique.

If you have any health concerns or injuries, seek advice from an appropriately qualified professional such as a GP or Accredited Exercise Physiologist.

Food and drink to fuel your run

While physical training is important in the lead up to Bridge to Brisbane, the fuel you put in your body will also affect how well you perform on the day.

Meal planning can help you eat healthier, shop smarter and curb bad eating habits. When you’re ramping up your exercise routine, it’s important to think ahead about what you’re going to eat and when, so that you’re giving your body enough energy to sustain your training. Having plenty of healthy food in the fridge and pantry can also stop you from reaching for unhealthy snacks when you get peckish after a run.

This Weekly Meal & Exercise Planner template can help you plan what you’ll be eating each week and when you’ll be strapping on your runners, with reminders about your weekly movement and nutrition goals.

Hydration is really important when you exercise, especially in Brisbane’s warm climate. You need to drink more water when you’re exercising to make up for water lost through sweat and exhalation. Plain water is optimal for rehydrating after a workout: you don’t need sports drinks unless you’ve been doing over 60 minutes of hard exercise.

Being organised is essential!

With good planning and motivating goals, you’ll be set to have a great Bridge to Brisbane, and keep up your healthy lifestyle after you’ve crossed the finish line.

How are you preparing for Bridge to Brisbane this year? Let us know in the comments below or share your snaps with us using the hashtag #bridgetobrisbane!  

Don’t forget to check out the Healthier. Happier. Training Guide in The Sunday Mail each week in the lead-up to race day.

Have you registered for Bridge to Brisbane 2018? Last year sold out, so enter NOW to ensure you are one of thousands of people pounding the pavement on August 26. 

 

What To Eat While Training

Healthy eating for successful training

Building a healthy running habit is not just about learning good technique and buying a pair of well-fitting sneakers. What you eat and drink will have a big impact on the efficiency of your training sessions, your recovery and your ability to perform to your potential in any races or fun runs you enter.

Find out what to eat before and after a run, and how to prep for and recover from race day.

The building blocks

The best place to start when thinking about nutrition is your everyday eating and drinking habits. Grabbing a healthy snack pre-run won’t make a huge difference if the rest of your diet is made up of junk, or you’re skipping food altogether.

Try to get into a pattern with your eating which includes three meals a day and may be supplemented by some healthy snacks. The 5 building blocks of food will give you an idea of the different food groups and how much of everything you should be eating each day, and the Healthier. Happier. recipe collections are a great place to look for healthy meal and snack ideas.

Carbohydrates are a really important part of a runner’s diet. Think about carbohydrates like the petrol needed to fuel a car. Without fuel, a car won’t run, and without carbs, you won’t run well, either.

Carbohydrates provide the fuel your body requires to support your day-to-day activities. If you don’t eat enough carbs, you might feel fatigued and unable to train effectively.

Good quality carbohydrates can be found in foods like:

  • Wholegrain, light rye or sourdough bread
  • Fruit
  • Untoasted muesli
  • Oats
  • Wholegrain pasta
  • Basmati rice
  • Legumes.

Eating carbohydrates before you run will help fuel your exercise. Then, eating more after you run will help your body refuel, replacing the energy you’ve used while exercising.

Before you train

Everyone feels differently about eating before a run: some don’t mind it, while others don’t like to have much in their belly before hitting the track. Even if you don’t like to eat before you run, having something small will give you energy to move to the best of your ability.

A pre-run snack could be:

  • One or two slices of wholegrain toast or raisin toast
  • A couple of fresh or dried dates
  • A small bowl of cereal with chopped fruit and yoghurt
  • Or a piece of fresh fruit.

If you’re exercising later in the day, try having something larger to eat an hour or two before your run. Try 150 grams of plain yoghurt and untoasted muesli or a wholegrain muesli bar with nuts or fruit.

After training

After a workout, there are three important things your body needs:

Protein

Protein will assist with muscle repair and growth. Aim to have 20-30 grams of protein in the hour post exercise, which you could get from 100-150 grams of lean meat or fish, 3 eggs, 150-180 grams of plain yoghurt, or a fruit based smoothie.

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates help with both refuelling your body and supporting the muscle repair process. A fruit smoothie, muesli and yoghurt, oats with milk, lean meat and rice or pasta and veggies are all great options to help replenish your energy reserves.

If you feel tired, lethargic or hungry within an hour after you’ve finished training, it’s a sign that you haven’t eaten enough carbs – so eat a little more!

Fluids

It’s not all about food – rehydrating before and after you run is a really important part of keeping you healthy and helping you perform your best when you run. Not rehydrating properly can actually decrease your performance by up to 60%, so make sure you’re drinking plenty of water both before and after you run.

For a particularly long training session over a couple of hours, or on race day, you can check how much you need to drink by weighing yourself before and after the event. Whatever weight you’ve lost during the run, you need to drink that much fluid plus 50% more to effectively rehydrate. For example, if you are 1 kilogram lighter after your run, you need to drink 1.5 litres of water.

On race day

Your diet shouldn’t change too much between training and racing. With practice, you’ll learn what feels best in your body before and after you run, and can mimic this on the day of the race.

Pre-race

The night before a race, eat a dinner that’s a little higher in carbohydrates to make sure your energy stores are full. Potato, rice or pasta are great options for a pre-race dinner, or have a lighter meal of yoghurt and fruit with oats.

Remember that good quality carbs will keep your energy levels stable, rather than the low quality carbs such as highly processed, sugary foods like lollies, chocolate or ice cream.

On the day of the race, eat as you have been during training. If you’re not a big pre-run eater, or your race is very early in the morning, plan to have something small that will give you an energy boost. Don’t forget to have plenty of fluids before you run!

Post-race

Even though it might be tempting to fill up on junk food as a reward after your run, sticking to non-food rewards (like getting a massage, or going to the movies) is a much better way to celebrate your achievement.

Try to eat a meal with plenty of protein and carbohydrates, like you have during training, within an hour of crossing the finish line. Make sure you consume plenty of fluids as well, to ensure you are properly rehydrated.

If you have to wait longer than an hour between finishing the race and getting a meal, have a simple snack like a wholegrain muesli bar or piece of fruit to tide you over until you can eat something more substantial.

Once the races are over, why not reward yourself by spending a beautiful day in South Bank? Relax in the Finish Village with family and friends, or give your body the fuel it needs with a meal from one of your favourite South Bank cafes and restaurants. Many South Bank retailers have exclusive deals for Bridge to Brisbane participants – all you have to do is show your race bib.

This blog was contributed by our friends at Healthier. Happier.

Got any other suggestions on what to eat while training? Let us know in the comments below. 

Yet to enter Bridge to Brisbane? Sign up NOW to secure your spot at the start line! 

Don’t forget to share your training snaps by using the hashtag #bridgetobrisbane!

 

Get Fit For Free: Five Ways To Train For Less Than A Breakfast Of Smashed Avocado!

Training that doesn’t hurt the hip pocket

Getting ready for Bridge to Brisbane doesn’t have to cost money, even if this is your first fun run. There are plenty of ways to get fit for free, both by yourself and in a group.

Fit fitness into your routine

Take a look at your daily routine and see if there are opportunities to add some exercise. Climb the stairs at work, go for a walk or jog at lunch, walk over to talk a colleague instead of emailing. You can even save money by walking, running or riding a bike to commute.

Get out in nature

Brisbane is surrounded by State and National Parks with tracks you can walk, run. Exercising in nature can help clear your mind, improve your mood and have positive effects on self-esteem, so grab a buddy and go exploring!

Find a free class

Brisbane City Council organises free fitness activities for people of all ages and levels of fitness. From boot camps to walking groups, aqua aerobics to yoga in the park, there’s a free class to suit every fitness regime.

Many council parks also have exercise equipment for public use. Find your nearest equipped park on the map and do a circuit a few times a week.

Find inspiration online

Between YouTube and Vimeo there is no shortage of free videos that cover everything from gentle exercises to get you started, to full 12-month fitness programs, all in exceptional detail. If anything, there may be too many, which can make it hard to know what’s right for you. Check out the Healthier. Happier. fitness collections, made up of best practice exercises for a range of goal-based workouts that you can do at home and are completely free of charge.

Fitness with friends

If exercising alone isn’t your thing, finding a group of likeminded friends could be the difference between achieving your running goals or staying on the couch. If you’re running Bridge to Brisbane as a part of a team, get your group together once or twice a week to train. If you’ve entered Bridge to Brisbane solo, ask friends, colleagues and family to exercise with you. Chances are you’ll know someone else seeking the benefit of a little peer motivation!

Make things interesting by switching up where you train, organising mini-races if your group is competitive, or tasking a different member each week to be responsible for leading stretches, picking a running route, or choosing a complementary workout for the group each week.

Saved a bit of money recently?

While training for Bridge to Brisbane doesn’t have to be expensive, there are a few things we recommend getting to make the most of your exercise:

Yet to enter Bridge to Brisbane? Sign up NOW to secure your spot at the start line on August 26.

Don’t forget to share your training snaps by using the hashtag #bridgetobrisbane!

How to Get the Most Out of Your Bridge to Brisbane Experience

Regardless of your age or fitness level, Bridge to Brisbane is an event that you can truly set your own goals for and make your own! Here are our tips for getting the most out of the event and the day as a whole.

Tailor the run to you

With a choice of two courses – 5km and 10km – participants can test themselves on speed, endurance, and everything in between – Bridge to Brisbane is suited to people of all ages and fitness levels! Start times are organised according to fitness level, so whether you’re running, jogging or walking, you’ll be surrounded by participants of similar abilities.

Pace setters will also be easily recognisable on the day, carrying coloured balloons that correspond to your race time. If you’re looking to achieve a particular time, or maybe even a PB, match your pace with the correct pace setter to work out whether you need to speed up or slow down to achieve your goal.

Alternatively, you can forget the testing altogether and simply focus on enjoying yourself! With prizes for the best-dressed (read: best costumes) and a heap of activities in the Finish Village after you cross the finish line, the entire event day makes for a fun and memorable morning in the river city.

Bubs in prams can also participate with parents or guardians for free, so why not sign the whole family up as a team and make the event a goal you can all work towards?

Prepare for race day so you can give it your best!

To ensure you get the most you can out of the day, make sure your mind and body are ready! Training and preparation beforehand is crucial – physical AND mental. On our blog, we have some advice on training and how to get started, as well as what you should be eating while training. To summarise our tip tips, we recommend creating a consistent routine, slowly building up your strength, setting yourself realistic goals, and having a great night’s sleep on August 25, so you can do your best on race day… no matter what your goal is!

Know the course

Familiarise yourself with the course maps, and take note of where the toilets and water stations are. That way, on the day, you can focus on yourself and meeting your goals, without worrying about which way to go.

Knowing the course will help you keep track of where you are and how far you have left to go, so you can keep motivation levels high where it matters. Of course, there will be plenty of volunteers and event staff along the course to help if you have any questions but, as they say, knowledge is power – even at Bridge to Brisbane!

Fundraise

Not only is our event an opportunity to be healthy, active and explore our beautiful city, Bridge to Brisbane is also your chance to give back to the community! If you’re passionate about a particular cause, you can raise funds for them by participating in Bridge to Brisbane.

When you do the Bridge to Brisbane, you’ll get two times – your race time and your Hero Time. Your Hero Time is your race time minus one second for every $1 you raise! Fundraising is just another way you can get the most out of Bridge to Brisbane and make a difference.

Remember to have fun!

Above all, Bridge to Brisbane is a fun run, and our goal is to provide every participant with an enjoyable experience! For some, it’s a way to achieve new goals, and for others, it’s a great opportunity to catch up with friends and family, and appreciate Brisbane’s beautiful scenery.

Sign up now to secure your spot! Visit www.bridgetobrisbane.com.au to register.

Running Back in Time: The Sunday Mail Bridge to Brisbane’s 22-Year History

Twenty-two years of Bridge to Brisbane…oh, how time flies when you’re having fun!

What started out as a local community event has grown to be Queensland’s largest fun run! Today, tens of thousands of people take to the streets of Brisbane to celebrate being healthy and active, and enjoy all that is great about our river city. For many people, it’s also an opportunity to raise funds and awareness for a charity of their choice.

Read on if you’d like to learn a little more about our 22-year history!

When was the first race?

The very first event kicked off in August 1997, with around 5000 participants. Back in the day, the race headed east towards the Manly coast line and was originally called the ‘Bridge to Bay’.

finish area of bridge to bay fun run at elanora park wynnum brisbane

View of the finish area of the Bridge to Bay fun run – Elanora Park, Wynnum. Photo taken by Mark/Cranitch on 3rd August 1997.

Fast forward to today, where the introduction of our new course in 2015 saw 30,000 people pound the pavement and our event sell out. Last year was the same, and this year is looking no different…so you’d better get in quick!

Who was the first winner?

For the first three years, Brissie local Pat Carroll managed to breeze past the competition and win the 12-kilometre 1997, 1998 and 1999 races. He was Queensland’s best distance runner at the time and crossed the finish line in just 34 minutes and 20 seconds. Here’s a fun fact… did you know the yellow figure in The Sunday Mail Bridge to Brisbane logo is an illustration of Pat victoriously finishing the race back in 1997?!

How has the course changed over time?

Our course hasn’t always taken in the same sights as it does today!

people running down gateway bridge for bridge to brisbane

The Bridge to Brisbane used to start at the Gateway Bridge. Photo taken by Drew Fitzgibbon, 5th August 2007.

When we were the Bridge to Bay, we started on the Gateway Bridge and headed east towards the bayside suburb of Manly. The Gateway Bridge remained the starting point for many years, but the finish line changed a few times – our name change to Bridge to Brisbane saw the route finish at New Farm Park, before settling on the Brisbane Showgrounds in 2008.

people cross the bridge to brisbane finish line in bowen hills

Participants cross the Bridge to Brisbane finish line in Bowen Hills, 2015. Photo taken by Jono Searle.

After eight events encompassing this route, 2016 marked the arrival of two brand new courses, created to encompass more of Brisbane than ever before. These are the same courses participants will take this year, and they’re here to stay!

The 10km course starts at Roma Street Parklands and crosses three of Brisbane’s iconic bridges – the Go Between Bridge, the Victoria Bridge and the Story Bridge – and the 5km starts at the beautiful Captain Burke Park, crossing the Story Bridge twice. Both courses finish in the South Bank Parklands where participants can enjoy a morning of fun and relaxation with friends and family post-race.

Runners at start line for Sunday Mail Bridge to Brisbane 2017.

Runners at the start of the Sunday Mail Bridge to Brisbane, August 27, 2017. Photo taken by Jono Searle.

What’s new in 2018?

This year, the Finish Line for both courses is on Little Stanley Street, so your cheer squad can watch you from the South Bank Parklands and encourage you during your run.

We’ve also just launched the Bridge to Brisbane app, which is now available for download on Google Play and the App Store! With a countdown timer, event updates and selfie filters, make the app your go-to guide for race day 2018. Just search Bridge to Brisbane to download now.

We also launched a brand new Bridge to Brisbane merchandise line, as seen on our friends at FitazFk Gym in The Sunday Mail.  With a range of items to suit all activewear enthusiasts, shop the full range right here ahead of race day!

two females and males modelling bridge to brisbane activewear

Stand out on the course with our new merchandise range. Photo taken by Macauley Ryan.

Why do people continue to race?

From the very beginning, The Sunday Mail Bridge to Brisbane has been much more than just a run. You don’t need to be an elite athlete to enjoy our event – Bridge to Brisbane is all about celebrating the very best of Brisbane, while appreciating being healthy and active. Elite runners, budding joggers and casual walkers can all take part in Bridge to Brisbane and have an equally enjoyable experience.

It’s also a chance to give back to the community – participants are encouraged to raise money for a charity of their choice, or for The Courier-Mail Children’s Fund. Since launching the event 22 years ago, participants have raised over $9 million for charities, including funds raised so far this year!

members of Team Cure Brain Cancer participating in Bridge to Brisbane

Team Cure Brain Cancer participating in The Sunday Mail Bridge to Brisbane in 2017.

Where do I secure my spot?

What are you waiting for? Join us as we continue to make history and sign up today for Brisbane’s biggest and best fun run, taking place August 26, 2018!

How To: Do the Bridge to Brisbane with Kids

Your Ultimate Guide to Doing The Sunday Mail Bridge to Brisbane With The Whole Family

Balancing the demands of family life with work commitments, health, fitness and your social life can be tricky, and in today’s busy world, it’s easy to get bogged down and let the things that matter the most fall to the wayside.

But, before you cancel those breakfast plans or hand in that spur-of-the-moment resignation letter, we might have a solution to finding balance, while kicking some major goals along the way! Why not try signing your family up for this year’s Bridge to Brisbane?!

As well as encouraging a healthy lifestyle, it’s a great opportunity for family bonding, socialising with friends, and relieving stress.

FULL DISCLOSURE: We know that family days out like this can feel like a mission to organise, so we’re making it simple for you, with our ultimate guide to doing the Bridge to Brisbane with the kids… You’re welcome!

REGISTERING

First things first: registering for the race! Children in prams and strollers can participate in both our 5km and 10km events for free with supervising adults. Older kids can be registered either as individuals or part of a team – there is no age restriction. You can register your whole family right here!

GETTING FIT, FAMILY STYLE

Incorporating exercise into your family routine will teach your kids about the benefits of exercise and instill healthy habits from a young age. It’s also a great way to spend time together as a family! Why not embark on a scenic walk or a family bike ride this weekend, to kick start your training!?

DRESS TO IMPRESS

If your kids love playing dress-ups, encourage them to sport their best ballerina tutu or hero cape at Bridge to Brisbane!

Even if you’re not first across the Finish Line, it doesn’t mean you can’t win in other ways – Bridge to Brisbane has cash prizes on offer for the Best Dressed Team and Best Dressed Individual!

Whether you decide to go as celeb look-alikes, storybook characters or pink pirates, it’s all about having a fun family day out and making lasting memories. Find out more about the prizes here.

CHECK OUT THE COURSE

Our course routes are very clearly signed, and we have plenty of event staff and volunteers around to help racegoers with any queries on the day.  With that said, to put your mind at ease, it is worth checking out our course maps prior to the race day.

Our detailed course maps for both the 5km and 10km race show the course route, and the location of key amenities, such as toilets and water stations, along the way. Familiarise yourself with them right here.

B2B Tip: Write your mobile number on your child’s race bib in case you do become separated. Any lost children or adults will be directed to the Information Tent at the Finish Village.

PACK SUPPLIES

Small backpacks are allowed on course with participants, so we recommend bringing some supplies to ensure your family day out runs as smoothly as possible!

Recommended items include:

  • Spare socks
  • Band-Aids
  • Hats
  • Sunscreen
  • Water bottles
  • Muesli bar/ Banana

Having these essentials on you will help to ensure your day is memorable for all the right reasons!

If you can’t bring these, or forget them on the day, that’s no problem – we have information tents, First-Aid operators and water stations at various points throughout our course.

GET THERE IN PLENTY OF TIME

There will be a number of changed traffic conditions in and around Brisbane on race day, so it’s important that you plan your trip in in advance! Road closures will be shared closer to the time, as will a public transport timetable.

We recommend arriving in plenty of time to find your start zone. Families with prams are required to start at the back of their chosen zone, to allow runners and individual participants to forge ahead.

CAPTURE THE MEMORIES

When participating in Bridge to Brisbane, happy snaps are a must! With some of Brisbane’s most beautiful scenery on display, don’t forget to take it all in and capture a few family selfies. We want to see your race day pics, so make sure you hashtag #BridgetoBrisbane when you upload them to your social media channels – you might even be featured on our social pages!

CELEBRATE!

Congratulations – you did it!

Once you and your family have conquered Bridge to Brisbane, it’s time to make the most of our gorgeous August weather and enjoy being out and about in our beautiful river city. Your race bib gives you access to some fantastic offers and discounts from a range of retailers – or as we like to call them, ‘Bib-ileges’! Refuel post-race and celebrate your family’s achievement at some of Brisbane’s best cafes and restaurants.

So what are you waiting for? Let’s get you and your family moving for Bridge to Brisbane 2018. Enter now via www.bridgetobrisbane.com.au, but hurry – Early Bird entries close June 30!

How To Start Running: 7 Tips From A World Champ | Bridge to Brisbane

Training tips from Sarah Crowley, World Champion Triathlete, Ironman Champion and Brooks sponsored athlete.

Are you thinking about signing up for Bridge to Brisbane, but worried you won’t be able to run the entire course? Or maybe you love running, but haven’t quite integrated it into your routine yet?

Whatever your situation, we’re here to tell you that it is not too late to start getting ready for Bridge to Brisbane 2018. Our race welcomes people from all walks of life and all fitness levels! As long as you’re passionate about Brisbane, health and fitness, or, most importantly, FUN – we want YOU to join us on August 26.

We recently spent time with World Champion Triathlete, Ironman champion, and Brooks sponsored athlete Sarah Crowley, who gave us her top tips on how to start training and get into a great routine.

Even if your goal isn’t to become an elite runner, we’re sure you’ll still find these tips valuable to your training – everyone has to start somewhere, right?

Health check

“If you have never run before, you should spend some time walking or doing some other form of exercise first, before hooking into a run program. A good guide would be comfortably handling 30 minutes of exercise per day, four or five days per week.”

Register for an event, like Bridge to Brisbane!

“A big motivator to continue your running is the challenge of a looming event! If you decide to sign up to an event, give yourself plenty of time – at least eight to 12 weeks – to get into great shape.”

Bridge to Brisbane Tip: Early Bird entries are still open – visit our website to find out more or enter! Bridge to Brisbane will take place on August 26, giving you plenty of time to train for the big day. The great thing about Bridge to Brisbane is that you don’t HAVE to run – we welcome runners, joggers, wheelies and walkers to join in the fun!

Buy some good shoes

“To avoid injury during your new running regime, it’s important that you’re equipped with the most appropriate pair of running shoes that are suitable for your foot type and running style from the start.”

Bridge to Brisbane Tip: Brooks Running has a great interactive tool called the Shoefinder, which helps you to choose the best running shoes for your requirements!

Get a training buddy

“Find someone at work or a friend who is also curious about running, and start together! It’s always easier when you have someone holding you accountable for your runs.”

Start small, start gradual

“Like a good red wine, running and fitness take time to mature. Start slowly with ‘walk-runs’ (10 minute walk, two minute run, twice through) then gradually increase the time spent running. Once you are running for 90 per cent of the time, increase the total time slowly (no more than 10 per cent at a time).

As a guide, you will have a good experience running a 5km fun run if you are running two to three times per week between 30-45 minutes.”

Run somewhere different

“You will quickly find a favourite course around your area, however, a good way to keep it fresh is to try and do your longer run on the weekend in a different location. Why not try a national park, beach or river bank?!”

Join a group

“It will take a couple of events to get the hang of it! After your first event, you might consider entering a club. This is what I did, and I felt it improved my performance, as I was being coached and it was a very social environment.”

Have we convinced you to register for Bridge to Brisbane 2018 yet? If so, head over to www.bridgetobrisbane.com.au to be part of Brisbane’s most Bridgey-didge day. Early Bird prices are still available, but places are limited!

Four Ways To Keep Fit (And Motivated!) This Winter

The mornings and evenings are getting chillier, and that can only mean one thing: winter is coming. As the average daily temperature starts to drop, it can be difficult to work up the motivation to leave the warmth of your house, or the comfort of your car, and get the motivation to train.

But before you start making excuses for why your training has slowed down, we’ve got four simple tips to make sure you stay motivated to prepare for Bridge to Brisbane during the cooler months.

Train with your mates

Whether you’re taking an early morning jog or participating in a team sport, it’s always easier to stay motivated when you’ve got friends by your side. Your friends are less likely to let you get away with skipping your daily fitness kick than you are, so setting a time and place to meet can drive those motivation levels through the roof! Training with a partner can also help to set fitness goals and work towards them together, or compete against each other for that extra push you need.

Track your training and reward yourself

If you’ve got a Fitbit or a fitness tracker, it can be super easy to keep track of your fitness routine. If not, a diary or daily planner is a great alternative! Keep track of which days you’ve exercised (and which you’ve skipped) and how long you’ve exercised for, and set a fitness goal each month so you can feel like you’re working towards something. Rewarding yourself for your hard work also helps – take yourself out for breakfast or buy yourself those new shoes… just don’t over-indulge and undo all of your hard work!

Create a fitness playlist

Listening to your favourite songs while you train is a sure-fire way to stay motivated! Whether you’re into 80’s rock, house music or orchestral pieces, exercising to a playlist of the music that motivates you is the perfect way to improve your fitness regime. We’ve curated a Spotify playlist with some of our favourite running songs, which you can check out and follow right here.

If you’re a morning runner, you could also try setting your alarm to your favourite fitness song…it’ll have you bouncing of bed to train in the morning, rather than rolling over for five more minutes of snooze time!

Work out at home

While we love exercise that takes us outside, we know that sometimes the very idea of walking out into the cold can put you off! Why not work around that feeling by exercising inside? Get yourself some fitness equipment, or work with what you have around the house to create a fitness routine that keeps you active from the warmth of your own home. You could also join a gym or do some fitness classes that keep you active, and indoors.

What are some of the ways you stay motivated during the cooler months? Let us know in the comments below.

Share your training snaps with us by using the hashtag #bridgetobrisbane.

Haven’t registered for race day? Enter now to take advantage of our Early Bird registration period.  

 

 

22 Signs You’re Totally Bridgey-Didge

Brisbane’s biggest and best fun run is back on August 26 this year! Born in Brisbane, here for Brisbane, and loved by Brisbane, Bridge to Brisbane is one of the most iconic fitness events in our state’s calendar.

The beauty of Bridge to Brisbane is that it brings together people from all walks of life for one fun-filled day of fitness, family and friends! Our race is a chance for the Queensland community to come together and celebrate being healthy and active, and enjoy all that is great about the river city.

This year marks the 22nd year of Bridge to Brisbane, so we’ve come up with 22 signs you are a Bridgey-didge Brisbanite!

  1. You’ve been counting down to Bridge to Brisbane 2018 since the last one wrapped up.
  2. August 26 is blocked out in your diary, email AND phone calendar for race day.
  3. You wear your Finisher’s t-shirt out and about with pride.
  4. You have a collection of costumes on rotation for race day.
  5. You get a new pair of running shoes at the start of each year, leaving you plenty of time to wear them in before the big day.
  6. You have vivid dreams about running the course and wake up in a sweat.
  7. You scope out the best Bib-ileges deals in advance and make a beeline for your chosen spot the moment you cross the Finish Line.
  8. You’ve taken at least one selfie during the Story Bridge ‘Story Sprint.’
  9. You’ve spent a minimum of five hours creating your ultimate Bridge to Brisbane training playlist.
  10. You and your running buddies have your own training group hashtag.
  11. You know the exact time each day that your favourite training route will be the quietest.
  12. Activewear, activewear, you go out for breakfast in your activewear!
  13. Come to think of it, are there any occasions that activewear isn’t appropriate?
  14. You’ve perfected the art of the sunrise (or sunset) training photo.
  15. You complain about how cold it is when the average temperature drops below 23°, but on race day, you bounce out of bed at 4am like it’s summer.
  16. When you’re stuck in traffic on the Story Bridge, you desperately wish it was race day, so that you could run across it, with 30,000 other people, and NO CARS.
  17. Regular excuses for missing training in Queensland include “we’re in the middle of a heatwave’, “it’s flooding”, or “we’re on cyclone alert.”
  18. You own more activewear than smart clothing, and more pairs of runners than any other shoe.
  19. If you don’t get your Bridge to Brisbane training session in, you sulk for days.
  20. You never leave the house without a water bottle, your activity band and a spare pair of socks.
  21. You exercise and participate in Bridge to Brisbane not just because of how it makes you look, but how it makes you feel.
  22. You love everything about the river city, but Bridge to Brisbane is your favourite event of the year!

Can’t tick all of these off? Take advantage of our Early Bird pricing and secure your spot on race day! Race to bridgetobrisbane.com.au to register now or find out more.

After the race…now what?

Congratulations, you’ve completed Bridge to Brisbane Day! Whether you raced your hardest through the 10km or took a leisurely walk over the Story Bridge with a group of friends, you’ve done a great thing for yourself and the community.

Achieving a goal is a great feeling. But what do you do after you tick that box?

Reflect – how do you feel?

Take some time to give yourself a pat on the back and think about how you feel after achieving your goal. Reflect on what’s changed since you decided to do the race – are you feeling healthier or happier? Is exercise a bigger part of your routine? Have you kicked any bad habits? Are there any other changes you want to make?

Decide what new habits you want to stick with and how you want to feel, then set about making your next health or fitness goal.

Setting new goals

Keeping the reasons you embarked on your Bridge to Brisbane Day journey in mind, think about what your next goals might be now that race day is over.

You might aim to continue running a few times a week, set a goal to continue cooking healthy dinners, or register for another fun run. Think about what long-term changes you want to make: do you want to improve your speed or distance, lose weight, or feel more energetic?

Use the S.M.A.R.T formula to set goals that are achievable and realistic, and write your goals down on a calendar or list. Think about the steps you’ll take to realise your goals, breaking them down into achievable chunks. Each week, think about what you’ll do to move a little closer to ticking your goal off your list, using a tool like the Healthier. Happier. Meal & Exercise Planner to write your weekly plan.

A suggested long-term goal is to write down your time from this year’s event and aim to shave time off this in 2018!

Keeping healthy habits

Sticking to healthy habits in the long term can be challenging, but there are a lot of tools to make it easier for you.

Stay motivated by tracking your progress, getting friends involved, and making sure you reward yourself when you stick with your new routine.

Use the Health & Fitness Age Calculator to get some insight into your overall health and wellbeing, either to motivate yourself to keep on working hard or to track the progress you’ve already made.

Mix things up in the kitchen by trying some new, healthy recipes, including healthy snacks, comfort food and fast family dinners. You can explore the Healthier. Happier. Library for more articles on healthy eating, exercise and goal setting.

What will you be doing to stay motivated now that Bridge to Brisbane Day 2017 is complete? Let us know in the comments below.

We want to see your race day snaps! Keep your photos coming by tagging us and using the hashtags #BestTimeBNE and #Bridge2Brisbane. 

The Sunday Mail Bridge to Brisbane Day 2017 Go-To Guide

Bridge to Brisbane Day 2017 is less than a week away… yes, you heard correctly – in five days you will be waking up to make your way to the start line of Brisbane’s biggest community event.

Preparing for the day doesn’t have to be a stressful experience, so we’ve prepared this go-to guide for all Bridge to Brisbane Day 2017 participants, to ensure you’re well and truly equipped for everything the day has in store.

PRE-RACE

RACE PACK

If you missed the mailing cut-off date, or opted to pick up your pack yourself, you will need to collect your pack from the Race Office at South Bank Piazza.

The Race Office will be open at South Bank Piazza during the below times for Race Pack collection:

Date Time
Thursday 24 August, 2017 8:00am – 6:30pm
Friday 25 August, 2017 8:00 – 6:00pm
Saturday 26 August, 2017 8:00am – 2:00pm

 

Your Race Pack includes your race number and official event t-shirt. Your race number is your official ticket to free transport on the morning, race entry access and access to the huge range of specials on Bib-ileges offers at South Bank after the race.

Don’t forget to bring a copy of your official Entry Certificate! You can collect race packs for your friends too – but you will need a copy of their Entry Certificate to do this.

If you are part of a team, your team manager will have had your race kit posted to them already, or they will collect it on your behalf prior to the race.

GETTING TO THE START LINE

There will be a number of road closures and changes to traffic conditions throughout inner Brisbane on the morning of Sunday, August 27. A map of all road closures is available here.

We recommend you take advantage of the free public transport options on race day to save you both money and stress! Simply show your official race bib and enjoy free travel until 3pm. Bus and train times can be found here, but please note that ferries are not free on race day.

If you decide to drive, our friends at the go via network are waiving tolls on the Go Between Bridge and Clem 7 Tunnel on race day from 2am – 1pm.

THE RACE

START TIMES/LOCATIONS

6:00am 10km Blue & Red Elite Wheelies and Runners Start Wickham Terrace, Access via Roma Street Parklands Boulevard
6:20am 10km Green Runners Start Wickham Terrace, Access via Roma Street Parklands Boulevard
6:55am 10km Yellow Joggers Start Albert Street, next to Roma Street Parklands
7:10am 10km Grey Walkers Start Albert Street, next to Roma Street Parklands
9:20am 5km Event Start – Elite Purple to start first Captain Burke Park, Kangaroo Point

COURSE DETAILS

The 10km course starts at the top of the Roma Street Parklands, on College Road, Spring Hill.

  • Bridges crossed: Go Between Bridge, Victoria Bridge and Story Bridge
  • Water Stations: 10km start line, Cultural Centre Tunnel, Marriott Hotel, Story Bridge, Kangaroo Point & Finish Line.
  • Toilets: 10km start line, Kurilpa Park, Ivory Street, Martin Street, Finish Village.

The 5km course starts at Captain Burke Park, at the end of Main Street, Kangaroo Point.

  • Bridges crossed: Story Bridge (twice)
  • Water Stations: 5km Start line, Story Bridge, Kangaroo Point and Finish Line.
  • Toilets: 5km Start Line, Martin Street and the Finish Village.

Look out for our volunteer pace setters as you go! They’ll be completing the race holding a coloured balloon related to their running time. They’re there to motivate you to beat your personal best time on race day.

Remember to stay hydrated throughout the race by stopping at our water stations. It might also be a chilly morning, so we encourage you to bring a jumper that you don’t mind leaving behind and we will collect them to donate to charity on your behalf.

POST-RACE

Race times for Bridge to Brisbane Day 2017 will be posted as soon as possible after the race at couriermail.com.au, so keep your eyes peeled! Our Facebook page will post the link to these as soon as they are available.

The feeling of finishing the race is a fantastic reward in itself, but for those of you with a competitive streak, there are a number of prizes available on the day! As well as 1st, 2nd and 3rd in the 5km and 10km events, there are also prizes up for grabs for best dressed, highest fundraisers, and more.

FINISH VILLAGE

The fun doesn’t stop when you cross the Finish Line on race day – organise for your friends and family to meet you in the South Bank Parklands and enjoy a beautiful day in our Finish Village. You couldn’t ask for a more stunning backdrop than our beautiful CBD just across the river, as well exploring South Bank and the Parkland surrounds.

There’s nothing better than a big brekky after your race, especially when it’s free! The Courier-Mail have a special offer for Bridge to Brisbane Day 2017 participants who take advantage of their exclusive subscription for just $1 for the first 28 days – you’ll receive a complimentary breakfast for you and a friend in the exclusive Sunday Mail marquee.

BIB-ILEGES

Just like last year, we’ve teamed up with a bunch of your favourite South Bank retailers to offer special deals to all race day participants.

Show your race bib and receive discounted food and drinks, freebies, and more as part of our Bib-ileges program! The full list of Bib-ileges can be found here.

There you have it – the ultimate guide to Bridge to Brisbane Day 2017!

Have we missed anything? Let us know in the comments below, or send us a message on Facebook. Otherwise, we’ll see you at the start line on August 27!

Share your race day snaps with us by using the hashtags #Bridge2Brisbane and #BestTimeBNE!

 

 

Five Tips For Calming Race Day Nerves

With less than three weeks of training left until race day, we sat down with elite athlete and osteopath, Steve Dinneen, to get his top tips for calming nerves when your foot hits the start line on August 27.

“A bit of nervous energy is good, so when you get nerves on race day, remember to use then in a positive way to improve your performance, not hinder it. Mindset is the key.”

Have a race plan – ask yourself, how do you intend on running the race?

Are you planning on starting out slow and working your way into the race, or do you intend on going out faster and seeing if you can hang on to the finish line? Will you run at a particular pace or feel, are you running with a friend/s, with a pack or solo? Going into the race with a strategy can help with calming nerves as you have a plan to focus on.

Self-belief – think positive

If you have done the training, the race is about putting the hard work into action. Those early morning runs or weekend training sessions have led you to this moment. Look forward to the finish line and testing yourself out along the way – there are people out there who would give anything to run. Be inspired by yourself and those around you who are getting out there to tackle the course.

Breathe

Take a moment on the way to the race, or before the start of the race, to find that relaxed and centred place in your mind.

Be organised and prepared

Get to the race early and be prepared for potential issues like traffic, toilets lines, getting to the start line, public transport or parking if driving. You might want to bring an old t-shirt to wear if it is cold that you can throw it off before the race starts. Have a $10 or $20 note in your shorts pocket in case you need money for something unexpected like a drink. Trying to stay relaxed and not get nervous when you are running late for a race is almost impossible. So think ahead.

Once the gun goes, so do all of those nerves!

Use them to work for you – know that nerves are a pre-race thing and once the race starts, the atmosphere, amazing views of Brisbane from the Story Bridge and endorphins will keep you Running Happy and nerve-free.

Good luck!

Steve Dinneen is a Brooks Running sponsored athlete, elite middle and long distance runner and coach. He works professionally as an osteopath and has worked in the health and fitness industry for over 15 years.

This blog was contributed by our friends at Brooks Running.

Got any other suggestions on calming nerves before a big race? Let us know in the comments below. 

Yet to enter Bridge to Brisbane Day? It’s not too late – but hurry, last year’s event SOLD OUT! Get your runners on and enter NOW. 

Don’t forget to share your training snaps by using the hashtags #bridge2brisbane and #BestTimeBNE!

 

 

Top tips to be a successful fundraiser

At everydayhero, we know how hard it can be to keep up momentum when you are fundraising for a cause you care about over a long period of time.

To help you continue to build on your fundraising to date, below are some tried and tested methods that will help you keep the ball rolling towards August 27!

Remind yourself

Remember why you are doing what you are doing – don’t forget the passion behind your reason to raise money for your cause.

Raise your profile

Make sure you have completely filled in your profile. Having a profile picture, an updated story, and sharing your page on social media can make a huge difference

Share your training

Connect your fundraising page with a fitness app such as MapmyFitness, Strava, or Fitbit and share your training updates with your family and friends. Show them how committed you are while getting in shape for the big day!

Don’t lose your momentum

If your donations slow down, you should speed up! Send out reminder emails to friends who have yet to donate, call in that favour you’ve been meaning to redeem andremind your loved ones of your passion behind what you are doing and the steps you are taking to achieve it.

Change

If you find yourself getting bored of your training programme change it, don’t risk hitting a plateau and becoming de-motivated. Try a new route or a new time to go for a run. Why not take a look at the Bridge to Brisbane day website and try out the official event route?

Goal setting

Set weekly or daily goals for your fundraising. Having smaller, more achievable targets will mean you’re more likely to achieve them and keep up your positive energy.

Pat your own back!

On that same note, reward yourself when you hit certain milestones within your fundraising or your training. Whether that’s taking time out to go to the cinema or just treating yourself to a day off, don’t forget to relax and recharge.

Raise money in good company

Get your friends and family to join in with your efforts, whether it’s for the main adventure or just helping out with your smaller fundraising events beforehand. Create a team for Bridge to Brisbane Day and join your efforts! As a team, you can all fundraise for the same organisation or pick the one you each care about most.

Enjoy!

Last, but by no means least, don’t forget to have fun!

Yet to enter Bridge to Brisbane Day? It’s not too late – but hurry, last year’s event SOLD OUT! Get your runners on and enter NOW. 

Don’t forget to share your training snaps by using the hashtags #bridge2brisbane and #BestTimeBNE!

This blog was written for the Bridge to Brisbane Day community by our friends at everydayhero.

How to fit Bridge to Brisbane Day preparation into your busy schedule

As the temperature drops, so too can our motivation to get out and pound the pavement, but with Bridge to Brisbane Day only eight weeks away, it’s time to re-ignite the fire in your belly to go out and smash your fitness goals. If you’re a little stuck on where to get started, we’ve come up with a few ways that will help you put the prep in your race day preparation for Bridge to Brisbane Day

Take the scenic route

There’s nothing pleasant (or productive for that matter) about sitting in traffic for an hour and a half. Why not throw on some running shoes instead and take the scenic route to work? Brisbane is an incredibly exercise-friendly city, with walking tracks, bike lanes and shared pathways forming part of most major routes. Walking, running or cycling is a great opportunity to soak up some Vitamin D and appreciate our beautiful river city in the flesh. Plus, as we move further into winter, you won’t need to worry about arriving at work dripping in sweat.

Lunchtime workouts

After a long day at work, it’s natural to want to curl up on the couch at home, rather than get out and exercise. Why not switch up the timings a little and exercise during your lunch break? Many gyms have classes over the lunch period, or if classes aren’t your style, find a walking track near your office and get your heart rate up over lunch. Not only will it help your cardio fitness, but that burst of endorphins will also help you smash through your afternoon to-do list.

Outdoor meetings

Rather than battling the noise of a café, or trying to stay awake in a boardroom, why not suggest grabbing a coffee to go and going for a walk for your next meeting? In addition to the physical benefit of being active, studies have shown that exercise improves creative thinking. Now that’s killing two birds with one stone!

Fun with friends

Working out with friends enables you to exercise and socialise, while keeping you motivated and accountable. Instead of seeing it as a 5km, look at it as a 5km talk. Positive encouragement from your workout buddies and achieving milestones together will set you well on the way to achieving your race day goals.

The commercial workout

If you like to multi-task, this one’s for you! If you like coming home from a busy day and sitting down to watch the news, why not bust out the exercise mat and work out while watching?

There are loads of stretches and workouts you can do while watching your favourite reality TV show – a simple YouTube search will open your eyes to a plethora of at-home workouts suited to your fitness level and style.

How do you fit Bridge to Brisbane Day preparation into your daily routine? Let us know in the comments below or share your snaps with us using the hashtag #bridge2brisbane!  

Don’t forget to check out the Healthier. Happier. Training Guide in The Sunday Mail each week in the lead-up to race day.

Have you registered for Bridge to Brisbane Day 2017? Last year sold out, so enter NOW to ensure you are one of thousands of people pounding the pavement on August 27. Get your runners on! 

How To Choose The Perfect Running Shoes For You

To cut a long story short, there is no single pair of perfect running shoes – because no two feet are the same.

From the shape and size of our feet to our individual biomechanics, each runner will have their own unique requirements from a running shoe to keep them running happy in the lead-up to Bridge to Brisbane Day 2017 and beyond.

So let’s narrow it down…..

ARCH

Getting the best fit for your foot is essential in ensuring the support is functioning to minimise additional stresses the body encounters while running. If you have a very flat foot, you need to choose a shoe that accommodates this – usually a straight lasted shoe. If you have a medium to high arch, a semi-curve shoe will hug through the midfoot to ensure a supportive fit.

SUPPORT

The amount of support you require will depend on how much your feet roll in when running or walking.

neutral shoe has the same density of material through the entire midsole, for a foot that is applying even pressure on either side (i.e. not rolling in). A support shoe will be reinforced with a firmer density midsole material at the arch, to resist compression when your foot is rolling in. A maximum support shoe will have even more of this firmer density foam, to help prevent feet from rolling in too far.

CUSHIONING

Cushioning is all about protecting the body, and providing an optimal running experience.

If a shoe is too soft or too firm, it may not provide adequate protection against the forces your body endures when running. Brooks running shoes utilise a combination of advanced midsole compounds that adapt to runners’ unique needs and wants, to keep you running happier and longer.

EXPERIENCE

As well as having different biomechanics, runners also have very different expectations of their run.

Brooks running shoes are available in a range of styles designed to provide a variety of running experiences. Brooks describes these experiences as the “float” range, which allows you to switch off and cruise through your run, while the “feel” range provides a more engaged run with increased responsiveness and connection to the terrain. They will all get you “from A to B”, but you can choose the experience best suited for your running style.

Looking for a new pair of running shoes before Bridge to Brisbane Day? Check out the Brooks Shoe Finder tool which will help recommend the best running shoes for you.

Written by: Sarah Wilson, Brooks Senior Technical Representative

Ready to debut those brand-new running shoes? Click here to enter for Bridge to Brisbane Day 2017.

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